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High-skilled visa applications hit record high - again

by Kijner & Sons International Realty





KSI Realty New York Inc. is pleased to share with you a recent article by Sarah Ashley O'Brien entitled "High-skilled visa applications hit record high - again" and published on CNN Money on April 12th, 2016.

Highly skilled foreigners who study at some of our Nation's top universities often find themselves creating their first startup right where they received their Master or PhD degree. From Harvard to Stanford, from the University of Chicago to Columbia University or the University of Florida, more and more highly skilled foreign brains are seeking a legal path to stay in the U.S.A.

Only 80,000 H1-B Visas are awarded under a lottery each year and most of them are already called for by April 9th of each year. 20,000 of these Visas are reserved for Master graduates or above.

America's top businesses and most innovative startups have over half of their founders as foreign nationals. The need to attract and secure the most skilled workers is one of our Nation's greatest interests. Not only will it benefit domestic workers by creating hundreds of thousands of jobs each year but avoid the loss of talents to foreign countries such as Canada, France, Germany, the UK, India and China that are trying to attract US educated top talents to fuel their thriving economies.

KSI Realty New York Inc. is pleased to inform you that many highly skilled investors can seek a legal path to permanent residency through our EB-5 programs or a legal non-immigrant work authorization through E-2 Treaty programs that are other excellent options vs. the hard to get H1-B Visa (sponsored by the prospective employer).

To read the full article, click here or on the image below:


NAR Global Perspectives: Foreign Direct Investment and Immigration

by Kijner & Sons International Realty

Kijner & Sons International Realty is pleased to share with you the latest report from the National Associations of Realtors® (NAR), entitled "Global Perspectives, October 2014: Foreign Direct Investment and Immigration".

This issue covers important insights on how immigration and foreign investments have a positive impact on the North American housing market and how Economic Development Organizations (EDO) can help connect businesses with foreign nationals looking to invest in residential or commercial real estate and relocate to the U.S.

To read the full report, look below or click on the following link

How can KSI Realty help you invest in or relocate to South Florida? Visit our dedicated page by clicking here

Questions? Comments? Looking to buy a house or a condo in Miami Florida? Contact us at info@kijner.com

Global Perspectives, October 2014: Foreign Direct Investment and Immigration

NAR Global Perspectives: Investment Visas

by Kijner & Sons International Realty


Kijner & Sons International Realty is pleased to share with you the latest report from the National Associations of Realtors® (NAR), entitled "Investment Visas: Competing for Investors on a Global Scale". 

This issue of Global Perspectives takes a spin around the world looking at investment visas, initially examining the U.S.’s EB-5, as well as similar initiatives in countries around the world. Each program uses different levers to attract specific types of capital, investment and entrepreneurial skills - and each is designed to benefit various aspects of a country’s economy.

To read the full February 2014 NAR report, click here or on the image below.




To learn more about the EB5 and how KSI Realty can help you invest in or relocate to the US, visit our dedicated page by clicking here

Questions? Comments? Looking to buy a house or a condo in Miami or Sarasota, Florida? Contact us at info@kijner.com

Profile of International Home Buying Activity 2013

by Kijner & Sons International Realty


Kijner & Sons International Realty
 is pleased to share with you the latest report from the National Association of Realtors® (NAR), entitled "2013 Profile of International Home Buying Activity". This report is based on a survey conducted annually since 2007 to measure the level of sales of U.S. residential real estate to foreign nationals. It provides information on international homebuyers and their preferences through data gathered from Realtors®. In this report, the terms "international" referes to both: 

> Type A: Foreigners with permanent residences outside the US and who purchase real estate properties for investments, vacations or visit purposes (they remain less than 6 months in the US)

> Type B: Clients who are recent immigrants (less than two years in the U.S.) or temporary visa holders and who reside for more than 6 months in the US for professional or educational purposes or other reasons

It is interesting to note that international sales accounted for $68.2 billion from March 2012 to March 2013, approximately a 6.3% of the total U.S. existing homes sales (EHS) market of $1.08 trillion for the same period. To most international buyers, the U.S. is seen as a desirable location, a secure and profitable investment with Florida being in the top four states in terms of number of buyers. Leading the way, Canadians and Chinese are the main international homebuyers of U.S. properties. 

To download and read the full NAR report, click here or on the image below.



Looking to invest in or move to the Greater Miami or Sarasota area in Florida? Contact KSI Realty at info@kijner.com

Profile of International Home Buying Activity 2012

by Kijner & Sons International Realty

Kijner & Sons International Realty is pleased to share with you the latest report from the National Association of Realtors® (NAR), entitled "Profile of International Home Buying Activity 2012". This report is based on a survey conducted annually since 2007 where the terms "international" referes to both: 

> Foreigners with permanent residences outside the US and who purchase real estate properties for investments, vacations or visit purposes (they remain less than 6 months in the US)
> Clients who are recent immigrants or temporary visa holders and who reside for more than 6 months in the US for professional or educational purposes or other reasons

It is interesting to note that from March 2011 to March 2012, international buyers accounted for 4.8% of total US sales, an estimated $82.5 billion of the estimated $928.2 billion total US market sales.

To download and read the full NAR report, click on the image below.

 

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Sourcehttp://www.realtor.org:8119/sites/default/files/reports/2012/2012-profile-international-home-buying-activity-2012-06.pdf

The Spring 2012 Paris Property & Investment Show - Our Conference

by Kijner & Sons International Realty

Kijner & Sons International Realty is pleased to share with you its latest conference in French "Real Estate in Florida: From Investment to Immigration" ("L'immobilier en Floride: De l'Investissement à l'Immigration")

Venue
Paris Property & Investment Show - Paris Expo Porte de Versailles (Hall 5, Village FNAIM)
Salon National de l'Immobilier - Paris Expo Porte de Versailles (Hall 5, Village FNAIM)

Country: France

Date: 30 March 2012

Time: 6:30 pm - 7:15 pm

Guest Speakers
Daniel Kijner (Senior Broker Owner of KSI Realty and Broker Associate with Re/Max Platinum Realty in Sarasota Florida)
Laura Kijner (Broker Owner of KSI Realty and Realtor® with Fortune International Realty in Miami, Florida)


Investing in Costa Rica

by Kijner & Sons International Realty

The second most frequent question asked by investors looking to acquire a property in Costa Rica is often "How can I obtain legal immigration status?". As pointed out by Costa Rican Attorney Alberto Pinto Monturiol and further explained in KSI Realty's "Investing in Costa Rica" section, there are 3 ways to obtain residency for foreign businessmen - other than family ties with a native Costa Rican:

1. The investor status

Investors have to demonstrate that they have invested in the country and that they have a Costa Rican corporation that owns and runs a business. The best businesses and companies should be in one of the following categories/industries:
> Tourism: Hotels, Resorts & Casinos, Bed & Breakfast, Lodges, Site Seeing Activities and Extreme Outdoors Sports Activities (aerial tram, river rafting, eco-tourism...)
> Tree plantation with an initial investment of $100,000 in the first 3 years
> Productive projects in which Costa Rican labor is hired (industrial production of goods or free trade zone activities)
> Banking Investments
> Real Estate Investments
> "National Interest" type projects defined by the Costa Rican Government (as of today for example, ecological protection programs)

A complete list of requirements for each specific activity will be provided by the attorney in Costa Rica in order to apply for residency when the type of investment is decided by the client.

2. Retiree Status

A retiree has to demonstrate receiving a life pension from a government or a retirement fund of no less than $1,000 per month. A complete list of requirements for this status will be provided by the attorney in Costa Rica in order to apply for residency, but the one mentionned above is the most important.

3. Rentista Status

This status applies to a person who receives a monthly allowance of no less than $2,500 per month. The person has further to demonstrate and guarantee that he/she will perceive this monthly income for at least 2 years with a letter from a first order bank or financial institution. A complete list of other requirements for this status will be provided by the attorney in Costa Rica in order to apply for residency, but the one mentionned above is the most important.

 


The third most frequent question asked by businessmen looking to invest in Costa Rica is "How much will it cost me to close a deal (expenses and legal fees) and obtain legal immigration status?". Costa Rican Attorney Alberto Pinto Monturiol covers some of the most important costs associated with the acquisition of a Costa Rican property and the application for a legal residency status:

1. Closing cost for a Real Estate deal is 4.5% of the value of the sales price. This includes a 1.5% tax for land transfer, 1% registration stamps' fee to the National Registry and a 2% notary fee (to be paid at closing)

2. Fees for the incorporation of a Company in Costa Rica are about $750. This amont includes legal fees (legal agent fee for the first year), registration stamps, publication in the official newspaper, and obtention of legal and accounting books. All expenses and fees need to be paid at signing. This could be an option if you wish to operate a business without getting the immigration status.  

3. Attorney's fees per hour in other retained activities are about $100 per billable hour

4. To apply for a residency status, costs are broken down as follow:

> For the first and second group of nationalities mentioned in our previous post, you should account for about $3,750. This amont includes a $3,250 fee per person, plus additional expenses of about $500 per client when all required documents are provided, legalized and translated (included is an incorporation of a company in Costa Rica to start the investment process). All expenses and 50% of the fee need to be paid at the start of the process, 25% when all documents are submitted to the Immigration Office and the remaining 25% to be paid when immigration status is granted.

> For the third group of nationalities mentioned in our previous post, you should account for about $4,750. This amont includes a $4,250 fee per person, plus additional expenses of about $500 per client when all required documents are provided, legalized and translated (included is an incorporation of a company in Costa Rica to start the investment process). All expenses and 50% of the fee need to be paid at the start of the process, 25% when all documents are submitted to the Immigration Office and the remaining 25% to be paid when immigration status is granted.

> For the fourth group of nationalities mentioned in our previous post, you should account for about $7,250. This amont includes a $6,250 fee per person, plus additional expenses of about $1,000 per client when all required documents are provided, legalized and translated (included is an incorporation of a company in Costa Rica to start the investment process). All expenses and 50% of the fee need to be paid at the start of the process, 25% when all documents are submitted to the Immigration Office and the remaining 25% to be paid when immigration status is granted.

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Disclaimer: Information and data as of February 2012, not binding and likely to be modified without prior notice. Please see a licensed and certified professional and seek legal counseling should you wish to invest in Costa Rica. Please note that the amounts given are estimates and their sole purpose is to give you an idea and help you set up a provisional budget. Costs and information maybe subject to change depending on the uniqueness of each investment project in Costa Rica.

Investing in Costa Rica

by Kijner & Sons International Realty

Have you ever wanted to visit and invest in Costa Rica? Then, Kijner & Sons International Realty is pleased to share with you a step-by step guide by Costa Rican Attorney Alberto Pinto Monturiol for investors interested in this Central American Paradise. 

When offering a client a property investment in Costa Rica, one of his/her logical requests will be: "I want to travel there and check out the property or business I am interested in acquiring". In order to properly advice you as a client, the first thing to do is to find out your nationality. This will allow to determine if you can come freely to Costa Rica (no visa required) or if you need an entry visa, and for how long you will be allowed to stay here as a tourist.



> The following first group of nationalities (and all of their territories) does not require an entry visa and can stay up to 90 days in Costa Rica:

Germany, Lithuania, Andorra, Luxembourg, Argentina, Malta, Australia, Mexico, Austria, Bahamas, Barbados, Montenegro, Belgium, Norway, Brazil, New Zealand, Bulgaria, Holland, Canada, Panama, Croatia, Paraguay, Chile, Poland, Cyprus, Portugal, Denmark, Monaco, Slovakia, San Marino, Slovenia, Puerto Rico, Spain, Serbia, The USA, South Africa, Estonia, United Kingdom (England, Wales, Scotland), Northern Ireland, France, Finland, Czech Republic, Hungary, South Korea, Island, Greece, Romania, Israel, Italy, Vatican City, Singapore, Japan, Switzerland, Latvia, Lichtenstein, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay & Luxemburg

> The following second group of nationalities does not require an entry visa and can stay up to 30 days in Costa Rica:

Antigua and Barbuda, Mauritius, Belize, Micronesia, Bolivia, Nauru, Dominica, Palau, El Salvador, Kingdom of Tonga, The Philippines, Samoa, Fiji, St Kitts and Nevis, Grenadines, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Guatemala, St Lucia, Guyana, Honduras, São Tomé and Príncipe, Seychelles, Surinam, Northern Mariana Islands, Marshall Islands, Tuvalu, Solomon Islands, Turkey, Kiribati, Vanuatu, The Maldives & Venezuela

> The following third group of nationalities requires a consular entry visa which is granted by the Costa Rican Consulate in their home country. If Costa Rica doesn’t have a Consulate there, it will be granted by the nearest Costa Rican Consulate (see below exceptions to this rule)*:

Albania, Malaysia, Angola, Malawi, Saudi Arabia, Mali, Algeria, Morocco, The Maghreb, Armenia, Mauritania, Azerbaijan, Moldavia, Bahrain, Mongolia, Benin, Mozambique, Belarus, Namibia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Nepal, Botswana, Nicaragua, Brunei Darussalam, Niger, Burkina Faso, Nigeria, Burundi, Oman, Bhutan, Pakistan, Cape Verde, Papua new guinea, Cambodia, Peru, Cameroon, Qatar, Colombia, Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic, Ivory Coast, Central African Republic, Comoro, Republic of Macedonia, Chad, Republic of Congo, Ecuador, Egypt, Laos, United Arab Emirates, Dominican Republic, Russia, Rwanda, Gabon, Senegal, Gambia, Sierra Leone, Georgia, Sudan, Ghana, Swaziland, Guinea, Thailand, Guinea Bissau, Taiwan, Equatorial Guinea, Tanzania, Tajikistan, Indonesia, Timor Oriental, Jordan, Togo, Kazakhstan, Tunisia, Kenya, Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan, Ukraine, Kosovo, Uganda, Kuwait, Uzbekistan, Lesotho, Vietnam, Liberia, Yemen, Libya, Djibouti, Lebanon, Zambia, Madagascar & Zimbabwe

 *Exceptions to this rule:

1) When citizens of the third group countries hold a Schengen visa or have a stamped visa from the United States of America, Canada, South Korea, Japan or any countries of the European Union, they will not require any other entry visa than this. They can travel freely and stay up to 90 days in Costa Rica.

2) When citizens of the third group countries have a legal residency, work permit or student visa from the United States of America, Canada, South Korea, Japan or any European Community Countries or Schengen signatory countries, they have to go to the Costa Rican Consulate in their home country to verify that document. If Costa Rica doesn’t have a Consulate there, it will be granted by the nearest Costa Rican Consulate. Then, they will be able to stay in Costa Rica up to 30 days.

> The following fourth group of nationalities requires an authorization process which is decided by the "Restricted Visa Commission" headed by the General Director of Immigration. These nationalities have to be invited by somebody in Costa Rica who will be responsible for them during their visit. This request has to be presented at the Costa Rican Consulate of their home country, to the nearest one to that specific country or directly in Costa Rica by an attorney or a person with power of attorney for the client. The visitor will then be able to stay in Costa Rica for the total of the granted days with a maximum of 30 days (see below exceptions to this rule)*:

Afghanistan, Jamaica, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Cuba, Palestine, Eritrea, Ethiopia, China, Syria, Haiti, North Korea, Iran, Somalia, Iraq & Sri Lanka

*Exceptions to this rule:

1) When citizens of the fourth group countries hold a Schengen visa or have a stamped visa from the United States of America, Canada, South Korea, Japan or any of the European Community Countries, they will not require any other entry visa than this. They will be able to travel freely and stay up to 30 days in Costa Rica.

2) When citizens of the fourth group countries have a legal residency, work permit or student visa from the United States of America, Canada, South Korea, Japan or any of the European Community Countries or of the Schengen signatory countries, they have to go to the Costa Rican Consulate in their home country to verify that document. If Costa Rica doesn’t have a Consulate there, it will be granted by the nearest Costa Rican Consulate, and they will be able to stay here up to 30 days.

3) In case of a still valid British National Overseas/BN Passport holder from Hong Kong, visitors will not require any other entry visa than this. They will be able to travel freely and stay up to 30 days in Costa Rica. Other Hong Kong visitors are citizens of China and thus under restricted entry visa.

4) Businessmen and investors form the People's Republic of China who request an entry visa at the Costa Rican Consulate validated by a letter from the "China Council for the Promotion of International Trade (CCPIT)" or "La Oficina Comercial de Promocer en China", will only require a consular entry visa granted by the Costa Rican Consulate in China. 

 5) All other countries not mentioned above are included in the fourth group

Premium Processing for the EB-5

by Kijner & Sons International Realty

The Director of USCIS, Alejandro Mayorkas, announced on May 19, 2011, a proposal to implement premium processing of cases under the EB-5 program. The significance of premium processing is that it is a program under which USCIS, in return for an additional fee of $1,225, currently, commits itself to deciding the case, or taking further action on the case by requesting additional evidence, within 15 days. There was a public comment period for the proposal that ended on June 17, 2011. On August 2, 2011, Director Mayorkas announced that within 30 days, USCIS will take the first step to implement premium processing for the EB-5 program. This does not mean that the program will be available then, but rather that USCIS will finish the first of multiple steps directed toward implementing premium processing for the EB-5 program.

An EB-5 investor's ability to file the I-526 petition with premium processing will depend on the regional center, in which he or she invested, obtaining USCIS's approval of its project ahead of time under the application procedures for the I-924 application. The I-924 application is currently used for obtaining approval of a regional center designation or of an amendment to an existing regional center designation. However, under the new procedures, either an entity that is just applying for its designation as a regional center could also present a project for approval of its eligibility for premium processing, or an existing regional center could apply to have its latest project approved as eligible for premium processing. A crucial factor in determining whether a project would qualify as eligible for premium processing is the extent to which work under the project can begin right after approval of the EB-5 investors' I-526 petitions, at which point the investment funds are normally released to the regional center's project. If the project is ready to that extent, then the regional center can opt to pay the additional fee for premium processing for the I-924 application, which would result in a processing time of 15 days. Otherwise, for such projects, if the regional center does not opt for premium processing, USCIS would, nevertheless, commit itself to a processing time of no more than 2 months. If the project is not ready to this extent, or the project is still only hypothetical, then the processing of the I-924 application could take up to 5 months or longer.

Once USCIS gives EB-5 investors the option to use the premium processing service for their I-526 petition, this will be a tremendous benefit to EB-5 investors from multiple perspectives. First, this will constitute a considerable improvement over the current processing time of 6-8 months for a decision on the I-526 petition. Second, there will be greater certainty that the I-526 will not be denied due to the regional center's project, since it will have been approved under the I-924 application process. Third, the availability of premium processing will improve EB-5 investors' chances to complete the process to obtain conditional permanent residence prior to the sunset of the EB-5 Immigrant Investor Pilot Program, which is the EB-5 program for the regional centers, on September 30, 2012. Fourth, for those EB-5 investors with a specific need for faster processing, such as those who are already living in the U.S. under a visa that will soon expire, or those EB-5 investors living outside of the U.S. who have plans to get their kids into school or university by a certain starting date, have a job offer in the U.S. with a certain starting date, or have other urgent plans to move to the U.S., the premium processing option for the I-526 petition will be tremendously beneficial.

When will premium processing of the I-526 petition become available? In remarks during the USCIS EB-5 Stakeholder Meeting on June 30, 2011, Director Mayorkas explained that premium processing will be phased in after USCIS accomplishes several steps in preparation. He stated, then on August 2, 2011, that the first step in implementing premium processing of the I-526 petition, will occur within 30 days of August 2, 2011. The remaining steps will presumably be accomplished over the coming weeks and months. Even once premium processing becomes available, regional centers will have to go through the process of applying for approval of their project to make it eligible for premium processing. Therefore, it will take an additional 15 days to 2 months for regional centers to obtain approval of projects that they can offer them as eligible for premium processing. So, we are looking at several months, at least, before premium processing will become effectively available to the public.

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Source: Article courtesy of our exclusive partner Anthony Olson, P.A., Immigration Law Firm (Sarasota, FL, August 21st, 2011)

Investing and residing in Costa Rica

by Kijner & Sons International Realty

You are planning to invest or move to Costa Rica soon but cannot seem to find relevant information on living and retiring, purchasing properties, ensuring clear title, using a corporation, closing costs, property taxes or obtaining a residency status over there. Then, Kijner & Sons International Realty is pleased to share with you some detailed answers to these common questions courtesy of its Costa Rican partner, Il Costa Rica Properties*

To get the answers, please click here

For more information about investment opportunities in Costa Rica, please contact us at info@kijner.com

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* To learn more about Kijner & Sons International Realty's partners, please visit the page "Our Ancillary Network". 

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