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Tips For Fall Maintenance 2

by Kijner & Sons International Realty

Fall is a great time to prepare the home for the upcoming season. It’s also a good reminder to check key areas around the home for defects or repairs.

We are pleased to share this list with you courtesy of the nationwide experts at Pillar To Post Home Inspectors:


✓ Check ceiling & surfaces around windows for evidence of moisture
✓ Check caulking around showers, bathtubs, sinks and toilet base
✓ Verify ceiling areas beneath bathrooms have no leakage
✓ Ensure all stairs & railing do not have any loose sections
✓ Test all fire & safety systems regularly, including carbon monoxide (CO) detectors
✓ Know the location of all gas shut-off valves


 Clean or change furnace filters every three months of operation
✓ Lubricate fan and motor bearings (only where indicated)
✓ Check fan belt tension and listen for unusual noises
✓ Keep area around heating and cooling equipment clear
✓ For boiler systems, check water level and shut-off valve for leaks
✓ Have system serviced annually prior to the start of the season


✓ Periodically check exposed wiring and cable. Replace as necessary.
✓ Check all lamp cords, extension cords & receptacles for wear.
✓ Trip circuit breakers every six (6) months & ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCI’s) monthly to ensure proper function
✓ Learn location of electrical service panels and label each circuit
 If fuses blow, circuit breakers trip frequently, or any appliance sparks or shorts out, contact a licensed electrician for repairs


✓ Look for loose or missing glazing putty
✓ Check caulking for deterioration at the openings and joints between dissimilar materials (e.g. wood and masonry)
 Check weather stripping
 Check for broken glass and damaged or missing screens
✓ Inspect all window and door hardware


✓ Check all faucets, hose bibbs and supply valves for leaking
✓ Check for evidence of leaks around and under sinks, showers, toilets and tubs. Check all joints for adequate grout.
 Inspect lawn sprinkler system for leaky valves and exposed lines
✓ Have the septic tank cleaned every two (2) years
✓ Check the main water shut-off valve for operation and leakage


 Check for any missing, loose or damaged shingles
✓ Look for open seams, blisters, bald areas on flat roofs
✓ Clean gutters, strainers and downspouts. Make sure downspouts divert water away from the foundation.
✓ Verify the attic has no evidence of any leaks
✓ Check flashing (sheet metal placed on joints of the roof to prevent water seepage) around all surface projections, sidewalls and protrusions
✓ Trim back all tree limbs and vegetation away from the roof
✓ Check fascia (board or roof trim) and soffits (connecting the roof overhang and the side of your building)  for deterioration and damage


✓ Check foundation walls and floors for cracking, heaving, spalling, deterioration or efflorescence
✓ Inspect chimney for loose, deteriorated or missing mortar or bricks
✓ Check grading for proper slope away from the foundation
✓ Verify basement and crawlspace has no moisture or leaks
✓ Check all wood surfaces for weathering and paint failure
✓ Inspect all decks, patios, porches, stairs and railings for deterioration
✓ Cut back and trim all vegetation from structures

Are you looking to sell or buy a house, a condo, a villa or an apartment in Miami Florida or New York City? Do not hesitate to contact us at or visit us at

Fire Prevention - Tips and Reminders for Staying Safe

by Kijner & Sons International Realty

Fire Prevention Week falls during October, and this month is a great opportunity to review fire safety and preparedness for your home and family. Preventing a fire in the first place can mean the difference between safety and devastation.

Cooking is the most common causes of house fires, and as a daily activity the potential for problems is high if care is not taken around the kitchen. While cooking, never leave cookware on the stove unattended. It can take just moments for hot oil or grease to flare up, and a pan of forgotten food can go up in flames. Baking soda can be used to put out a small kitchen fire if caught right away – keep a package close at hand for ready use. Avoid wearing clothing with very long or loose sleeves while cooking as they can easily catch fire if they make contact with an open flame or hot burner. Keep towels and flammable pot holders away from the stove. 

Electrical cords and appliances should be kept in good repair, and any damaged wires or sockets should be replaced right away. Don’t overload electrical outlets – use power strips only when necessary and make sure they are properly rated. Electronics and small appliances should be unplugged when not in use to avoid potential problems.

Keep the dryer vent hose free of lint and other buildup, as dryer heat can easily spark a fire there. Check and clean the hose at least once a year for best results. Depending on how and where the hose is installed, the process can be as simple as using your vacuum cleaner to remove buildup. Bonus: the dryer will also run more efficiently with a clean hose. There are also professional services that will clean your venting system for a nominal charge. Never leave the house while the dryer is running – if a fire should start, you will only discover it too late.

Should a fire occur, fire extinguishers need to be easily accessible to the kitchen and laundry areas. Make sure any extinguisher is labeled for use on the three common types of fires – grease, paper/wood, and electrical. These multipurpose extinguishers are labeled as “A B C rated.” Using the wrong type of extinguisher on a particular fire can make the situation worse and can even be life-threatening. Water should never be used on an electrical fire or on grease fires as this will just cause the fire to worsen. 

Smoke alarms should be installed on every level of the home and outside all sleeping areas. The newest types of residential smoke detectors have 10-year batteries, and many are available in updated, low-profile designs. If your smoke alarms use replaceable batteries, change the batteries once a year; many people use the transition from Daylight Saving Time as a reminder to do this task. Hard-wired smoke alarm systems should be inspected according to the installer’s or manufacturer’s instructions.

Make – and practice – a family escape plan. Make sure each family member knows how to quickly get out of the house to safety in the event of a fire. The National Fire Protection Association recommends having two ways out of the house, in case smoke or flames make one of the exit routes impossible to use. Smoke can fill a house within minutes, making it difficult or even impossible to see the way out. With preventive measures, you can lower the chances of a fire, but careful planning can help you and your family survive if the worst happens.

Questions? Comments? Are you looking to buy or sell a house, a condo, a coop or a villa in Miami Florida or New York City? Contact us today at

Sick House Syndrome

by Kijner & Sons International Realty

What Is Sick House Syndrome, and What Causes It?

Sick House Syndrome occurs when a house can’t “breathe” and rid itself of indoor pollutants, resulting in poor indoor air quality – a “sick house”. Inadequate ventilation allows these pollutants to build up, causing potential health risks to the home’s occupants. Young children, the elderly, and some chronically ill persons are most susceptible to the effects of Sick House Syndrome.

Common sources of indoor pollution include tobacco smoke, certain carpeting materials, furnaces and fireplaces, pressed wood cabinets and furniture, and household cleaning products. In addition, a buildup of moisture can cause mold, which can grow uncontrolled inside walls, crawlspaces, and other areas. Mold spores are released into the air and can also travel throughout the home via heating and cooling ductwork.

How Can Indoor Pollution Be Reduced?

Source control is usually the most effective way to improve indoor air quality. In some cases, eliminating the specific sources of indoor pollution – for example, removing carpets, repairing and maintaining faulty furnaces – is all that is necessary. It’s also a good idea to have heating and cooling ducts cleaned every few years.

For many other offending substances, improving ventilation is a key means of decreasing indoor pollution. These include tobacco smoke, cleaning products, and moisture buildup. Many newer homes in particular are so well insulated and sealed that only a very limited amount of fresh air can get in. In this situation, using attic or window fans and opening windows when weather permits are easy and inexpensive ways to increase ventilation. Over the years, tobacco smoke can actually be absorbed by walls, floors, and ceilings and may need to be professionally removed.

Asbestos and lead do not normally cause problems if they are undisturbed, but these and other hazardous substances should be analyzed by a qualified professional to determine if sealing, abatement, or removal is warranted. The presence of these materials may also need to be included in disclosure forms when selling a home, so special attention is warranted in these situations.

Questions? Comments? Are you looking to buy or sell a house, a condo, a coop or a villa in Miami Florida or New York City? Contact us today at


Tips For Fall Maintenance

by Kijner & Sons International Realty

The leaves are turning, the air is cooling – autumn is just around the corner. Now is the perfect time to get your property in shape before winter rolls in so that you can help avoid problems in the months ahead. Here are some tips to get you started:

Seal it up: Caulk and seal around exterior door and window frames. Look for gaps where pipes or wiring enter the home and caulk those as well. Not only does heat escape from these openings, but water can enter and cause mold problems and even structural damage.

Look up: Check the roof for missing or damaged shingles. Water, wind, ice and snow can cause serious damage to a vulnerable roof, leading to a greater chance of further damage inside the home. Always have a qualified professional inspect and repair the roof, but you can use binoculars to do a preliminary survey from the ground.

Clear it out: Clear gutters and eaves of leaves, sticks, and other debris. If the gutters can accommodate them, leaf guards can be real time-savers and can prevent damage from clogged gutters. Check the joints between sections of gutter, as well as between the gutter and downspouts, and make any necessary adjustments or repairs.

No hose: In climates with freezing weather, garden hoses should be drained and stored indoors to protect them from the elements. Shut off outdoor faucets and make sure exterior pipes are drained of water. Faucets and pipes can easily freeze and burst, causing leaks and increasing the potential for serious water damage.

Warm up time: The furnace should be inspected to ensure that it’s safe and in good working order. Most utility companies will provide no-cost furnace inspections to their customers, but schedule early as there can often be a long waiting list as the weather cools down. Replace disposable furnace air filters or clean the permanent type according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Using a clean filter will help the furnace run more efficiently, saving money and energy.

Light that fire: A wood-burning fireplace can be a real pleasure on a chilly fall evening. For safety, have the firebox and chimney professionally cleaned before use this season. Creosote, a byproduct of wood burning, can build up to dangerous levels and cause a serious chimney fire if not removed.

With these easy steps, you’ll enjoy the comforts of your home all season long and know that you’re protecting your investment, too.

Are you looking to sell or buy a house, a condo, a villa or an apartment in Miami Florida or New York City? Do not hesitate to contact us at or visit us at

The Difference Between a Condominium and a Cooperative

by Kijner & Sons International Realty

Many people looking to buy a property in New York City are often debating between investing in a condominium or a cooperative. But what is the difference? Before choosing one over the other, let's review their definition, your ownership rights and what every buyer should know before acquiring such properties.

What is a condominium

A condominium is a real property transaction where ownership rights are fee simple, that is, the broadest form of ownership available. You are allowed to you to use and possess your property and you may own your condo in any form you wish (in severalty, as joint tenancy, as tenants in commons or tenants by the entirety).

With a condominium you own real estate - the space inside the unit - and you share in the ownership of the common elements such as the swimming pool, the walkways or the garage. As such, you will receive a deed to your unit that will include an undivided interest in the common areas. You can learn more about your rights in the condominium bylaws. Subletting is possible with some restrictions depending on the condominium building.

What is a cooperative or co-op?

With a co-op, you own share in a cooperative's corporation, which is not real property but personal property. Since you do not own any real estate, you do not have fee simple ownership rights. You own shares which reflect equity in the corporation and instead of a deed, you will receive a proprietary lease and stock certificates.

A cooperative is a not-for-profit corporation, a joint venture with its shareholders, formed for their benefit and governed by them. As such, the cooperative is the one owning the land, the building and all rights and interests. In short, you have a right to occupy your unit and use the common areas and facilities. And of course, unlike with buying a condo unit, we will need to submit a thorough application known as a board package that is unique to each co-op. This package will be reviewed, approved or denied by the co-op board based on a variety of personal and financial documents including but not limited to your purchase application, a contract of sale, employer and personal reference letters, your income tax returns, a financial statement listing assets and liabilities...Finally, subletting is much more restricted and is some occasions, not allowed.  

What is a Condop?

Some of you might have heard of a hybrid between a condominium and a cooperative known as Condops? What is it you ask? 

A condop is a mix-used building where the residential portion (co-op) is separate from the commercial component (condo). This form of property is appealing to many developers or sellers for tax reasons. They retain ownership of the non-residential space in the building that they use for commercial purpose. In a condop, a buyer will receive co-op corporation share and a proprietary lease. Condops are usually based on the 80/20 rule where 80% of the building is used for residential purpose and the remaining 20%, for commercial purpose.

Do you have additional questions? Are you looking to buy a condominium or a cooperative unit in New York City? Contact our Manhattan office today at

Storage in a smaller home

by Kijner & Sons International Realty

While “tiny houses” take storage planning to an extreme, your typical smaller home still needs accessible, well-planned storage to make it both efficient and livable. Making better use of existing space is a leading trend in home design and usage patterns throughout the home in both remodeling and new construction.

Most people use a back or garage entrance to the home rather than the front door. It’s a great idea for these entryways to incorporate “drop zones”, where everyone can unload their backpacks, shoes, bags, sports gear, and outerwear. Baskets under benches provide both seating and storage. Some drop zones incorporate a dedicated shelf or cubby for each family member’s gear. A tray or shallow box for mail keeps it visible but doesn’t let it pile up too high. As a high-traffic area, a drop zone should be well organized and systematic in order to really work. If one system doesn’t quite function well for a particular family, it will always be best to try another arrangement until settling on one that really works.

Home offices are another area where storage is at a premium as functionality changes. These spaces are often used not only as an office, but for homework, projects, and more. Effective, multi-purpose closet storage can be accomplished by replacing hanging rods with shelving and drawers. A dresser can be repurposed to store project materials for easy access. With multiple users, this multi-function room, like the drop zone, needs to have a workable system that everyone can follow.

In the kitchen, pantry space has become more important as more people cook and eat at home. In large homes, a pantry might be a separate room with plenty of space for storing everything from china to dog kibble. Newly popular smaller homes, generally with smaller kitchens, need to at least accommodate kitchen staples and larger, bulky items that aren’t often used such a large mixing bowls, seldom-used small appliances, and serving pieces. Pantry shelving for food items should be relatively shallow so that everything is easy to find and reach. This type of shelving can even be added to a niche in the wall between two studs.

Smaller homes aren’t going away, and continue to be popular as starter homes and with downsizers. But with efficient, practical storage solutions, even a smaller home can accommodate the needs of almost any family. 

Are you looking to sell or buy a house, a condo, a villa or an apartment in Miami Florida or New York City? Do not hesitate to contact us at or visit us at

The Vacation-Smart Home

by Kijner & Sons International Realty

As summer gets into full swing, it makes sense to review some simple but important steps you should take to secure your home while you head off for a well-deserved vacation. Amidst all of the decisions about where to go, where to stay, and what to do when you get there, taking some time to plan for leaving your home safe and secure will give you added peace of mind while you’re enjoying your free time.

Here are some useful reminders and tips for protecting your home while you’re away:

  • Make your home appear occupied by using timers on a few lights throughout the house, scheduling them to turn off and on at various times after dark. You can also use a timer on a radio to provide background noise to deter potential intruders.
  • Use extra caution when communicating about your vacation dates on Facebook and other social media. Information spreads quickly, and you don’t want it to get into the wrong hands.
  • Advise your friends and trusted neighbors of your travel plans and when you’re expecting to return. Provide your mobile number so you can be reached in an emergency.
  • Have the post office hold your mail and suspend any newspaper deliveries, or ask a neighbor to collect them for you each day. A buildup of mail or uncollected papers is an obvious sign that no one is at home.
  • Ask a neighbor to park in your driveway on occasion so it looks like there is someone at home.
  • If you have landline phones, turn off the ringers so they can’t be heard from outside. Leave a note on at least one of the phones as a reminder to turn them back on when you return.
  • Arrange to have someone mow the lawn in your absence if you’re going to be gone for more than a week.
  • Close the window coverings on any ground-level rooms so that would-be thieves aren’t tempted by valuables and other items visible from outside.
  • Unplug appliances such as the coffee maker, toaster, microwave, computers, video systems, stereos, and televisions. Be sure to leave the refrigerator and freezer plugged in.
  • To avoid the potential of water damage from an unpredictable leak or a burst hose, turn off the water supply lines for the toilets, sinks, washing machine, dishwasher, and ice maker. It’s easy to do and can help avert coming home to a disaster.
  • Adjust the water heater to its lowest setting or to vacation mode if it has one. Maintaining the hot water at its everyday temperature while you’re away wastes energy and money.
  • If possible, pack your vacation gear into the car while it’s in the garage so that you’re not announcing to passersby that you’re leaving for an extended period.
  • Lock the garage, gates, and storage structures. Don’t forget to lock any side doors to the garage, as well as doors leading inside from the garage.

Enjoy your time away, knowing that you’ve taken these smart measures to keep your home safe and secure.

A Night with the Art

by Kijner & Sons International Realty

Summer nights in New York are vibrant and filled with cultural and social events. This is what makes this city so attractive to millions of creative minds, artists and art lovers around the globe. KSI Realty New York Inc.’s Broker and President Marc-Henri J. Kijner, was invited on June 21st, 2016 to discover iconic British born Shantell Martin's latest exhibition "Gone",
 at 3 Howard Street Gallery in the heart of Nolita. This private, invite only reception announced the visual artist imminent departure from New York City, and celebrated the impact it had on her practice over the past 7 years. Shantell is best known for her stream-of-consciousness drawings and lights projections.  

The event was impeccably hosted by a funky DJ, several Bombay Sapphire cocktails bars, and trays of French cheeses and sweet Beignets
 like in New Orleans. The Art displayed on white walls allowed the artist's inner feelings to be expressed to a diverse audience. This is another testimony of the influence that New York has on the world's culture scene. It is a constant reminder of the source of inspiration and the "Muse" that this grandiose city plays for many recognized and acclaimed artists such as Shantell Martin. 

KSI Realty New York Inc., has several commercial and residential properties available for rent or sale that are suitable for artists such as live/work lofts. Please 
contact us with your requests. One of our expert licensed salespersons will be delighted to assist you as well as share your passion for art, and everything that it encompasses.

Getting your House Ready for Sale

by Kijner & Sons International Realty

Most homebuyers will prefer a home that’s in turn-key, move-in condition. When looking at a home, buyers want to focus on what’s great, not what needs fixing or is in poor condition. Sellers can do a lot to make sure their home shows well and will get better offers than those that are in obvious need of TLC. The idea here is to take the attention off areas of superficial concern that buyers might otherwise focus on. Every negative adds up in the buyer’s mind, so it’s wise to do some basic updates and repairs before the home goes on the market.

Update Kitchen & Bathrooms

While a complete kitchen or bath remodel may not be possible or practical – and may not give a full return on the investment – some updating of these rooms will go a long way in appealing to potential buyers. In many neighborhoods upgraded and updated kitchens and baths are the norm and anything less will be looked upon negatively.

If the stove and refrigerator are clearly old and in less than perfect condition, they should be replaced. An updated kitchen faucet is another nice touch that doesn’t have to cost a lot. In the main bathroom, have the tile flooring professionally cleaned and the grout sealed. If the tile floor is in bad shape, replacing it with new, basic tile will make it a non-issue. Here, too, an updated faucet is often a good choice. If there is a shower curtain, replace it with a new, neutral style, or better yet, remove it altogether for a tidier appearance.

Clean or replace carpets

It should go without saying that carpets should be shampooed and in good condition. If the carpet looks worn and stained, the best choice is to simply replace it. The same goes for kitchen flooring – if it’s in bad shape, new flooring is the way to go. Depending on the situation, a new floor can often be installed right over the old one, which can mean less work and cost. Any replacement flooring should be neutral colored and does not have to be top-of-the line quality; the most important thing here is that it looks good and does not draw negative attention.

Enhance the Outdoors

Outdoors, replace any missing or damaged fence boards. It may be obvious that they’ve been replaced, but that’s preferable to leaving the fence in bad shape. Shrubs should be trimmed and kept neat, and weeds pulled. A thick (and quick!) application of bark mulch will help planting areas look clean and neat instead of a mess the new owner will have to deal with. Check around the exterior for any peeling paint or cracks that can present themselves as problems if not corrected.

Above all, remember that a buyer will have a better impression of a home that looks its best. After all, one of the first impressions you want a buyer to have is “It looks like this home has been well taken care of” – and let the home shine.

For more tips that will help you get your house ready to sell, just click here.

Are you looking to sell or buy a house, a condo, a villa or an apartment in Miami Florida or New York City? Do not hesitate to contact us at or visit us at

Special Investors - Development Projects in Florida

by Kijner & Sons International Realty



Kijner & Sons International Realty is pleased to present its current development projects in Southeast and Central Florida, courtesy of Fortune International Realty.
To learn more about a specific project, just click on the desired image. 

Discover our various investment offers in the Greater Miami area inclusive of the cities of Miami, Miami Beach, Brickell, Downtown Miami, Sunny Isles Beach, Hollywood Beach, Fort Lauderdale and up to Orlando in Central Florida. 


3900 ALTON
3900 Alton Road
Miami Beach, FL 33139

3900 Alton Road, Miami Beach, Florida

       4 MIDTOWN
3301 NE 1ST Avenue
Miami, FL 33131

4 MIDTOWN, 3301 NE 1st Avenue, Miami, Florida


2220 North Atlantic Bvld
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33305


1444 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, FL 33132


700 Brickell Avenue
Brickell, FL 33131



850 South Miami Avenue
Brickell, FL 33131


4111 South Ocean Drive
Hollywood Beach, FL 33019



3401 NE 1st Avenue
Miami, FL 33137

16901 Collins Avenue
Sunny Isles Beach, FL 33160



3250 NE 1st Ave
Miami, FL 33137



999 S.W. 1st Ave
Miami, FL 33130


14 NE 1st Ave
Downtown, FL 33132



600 NW 31st Street
Brickell, FL 33137


1750 North Bayshore Drive
Miami, FL 33132



600 NE 31 Street
Miami, FL 33137


600 NE 31st Street
Miami, FL 33137



13757 S. Apopka Vineland Rd
Orlando, FL 32821


801 South Miami Avenue
Brickell, FL 33131



15701 Collins Avenue
Sunny Isles Beach, FL 33160


For more information and to schedule a visit, contact us today at

Displaying blog entries 1-10 of 373




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